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Reply: Tue Apr 26 2016 17:07:07 GMT-0400 (EDT)
Reply To: Cannibalism by a Barred Owl
Jason Hill 1 Contributor
April 26, 20161 Version
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@article{ReplyTueApr22016, title={Reply: Tue Apr 26 2016 17:07:07 GMT-0400 (EDT)}, author={Jason Hill}, year={2016}, note={version: 57a22cdc5a4037b8e01aebbc}, publisher={PubPub}, }

APA

Jason Hill. (2016). Reply: Tue Apr 26 2016 17:07:07 GMT-0400 (EDT). PubPub, [https://www.pubpub.org/pub/571fd87bf4bc0a3d0039f750] version: 57a22cdc5a4037b8e01aebbc

MLA

Jason Hill. "Reply: Tue Apr 26 2016 17:07:07 GMT-0400 (EDT)". PubPub, (2016). [https://www.pubpub.org/pub/571fd87bf4bc0a3d0039f750] version: 57a22cdc5a4037b8e01aebbc

Chicago

Jason Hill. "Reply: Tue Apr 26 2016 17:07:07 GMT-0400 (EDT)". PubPub, (2016). [https://www.pubpub.org/pub/571fd87bf4bc0a3d0039f750] version: 57a22cdc5a4037b8e01aebbc
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: "I just found a similar situation in Williston. Walking through the woods, I spooked a larger barred owl that had a smaller barred owl in its talons. It ended up dropping its prey/meal. One wing and the head were missing." -
The missing head and wing would seem to be more in line with scavenging, and there would be no reason for the owl to remove these body parts to consume the body cavity muscle.
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