Login
Hide
Panel
Reply: Tue Mar 22 2016 16:26:29 GMT-0400 (EDT)
Reply To: Reply: Sun Mar 13 2016 13:04:01 GMT-0400 (EDT)
Tiffany Lambert 1 Contributor
March 22, 20161 Version
Not Featured in any Journals
Cite

Bibtex

@article{ReplyTueMar22016, title={Reply: Tue Mar 22 2016 16:26:29 GMT-0400 (EDT)}, author={Tiffany Lambert}, year={2016}, note={version: 57a22cbc5a4037b8e01ad8f0}, publisher={PubPub}, }

APA

Tiffany Lambert. (2016). Reply: Tue Mar 22 2016 16:26:29 GMT-0400 (EDT). PubPub, [https://www.pubpub.org/pub/56f1aa75750a63380055af5a] version: 57a22cbc5a4037b8e01ad8f0

MLA

Tiffany Lambert. "Reply: Tue Mar 22 2016 16:26:29 GMT-0400 (EDT)". PubPub, (2016). [https://www.pubpub.org/pub/56f1aa75750a63380055af5a] version: 57a22cbc5a4037b8e01ad8f0

Chicago

Tiffany Lambert. "Reply: Tue Mar 22 2016 16:26:29 GMT-0400 (EDT)". PubPub, (2016). [https://www.pubpub.org/pub/56f1aa75750a63380055af5a] version: 57a22cbc5a4037b8e01ad8f0
LoginFollow
0 Followers
Looking to cultural critic Raymond Williams, a rise in the use and purchase of goods (and therefore users) can also be traced within the etymology of the word consumer. By his account, expounded upon in Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society (1976), “In almost all its early English uses, consume had an unfavourable sense; it meant to destroy, to use up, to waste, to exhaust. It was from the middle 18th century that consumer began to emerge in a neutral sense in descriptions of bourgeois political economy.”
Contents
Discussions
Contents
Discussions
Show Threads