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Reply: Sun Mar 13 2016 13:04:01 GMT-0400 (EDT)
Reply To: Reply: Fri Feb 26 2016 23:42:42 GMT-0500 (EST)
Kevin Slavin 1 Contributor
March 13, 20161 Version
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@article{ReplySunMar12016, title={Reply: Sun Mar 13 2016 13:04:01 GMT-0400 (EDT)}, author={Kevin Slavin}, year={2016}, note={version: 57a22cbc5a4037b8e01ad8c9}, publisher={PubPub}, }

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Kevin Slavin. (2016). Reply: Sun Mar 13 2016 13:04:01 GMT-0400 (EDT). PubPub, [https://www.pubpub.org/pub/56e59d817b8ef338007f4cc4] version: 57a22cbc5a4037b8e01ad8c9

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Kevin Slavin. "Reply: Sun Mar 13 2016 13:04:01 GMT-0400 (EDT)". PubPub, (2016). [https://www.pubpub.org/pub/56e59d817b8ef338007f4cc4] version: 57a22cbc5a4037b8e01ad8c9

Chicago

Kevin Slavin. "Reply: Sun Mar 13 2016 13:04:01 GMT-0400 (EDT)". PubPub, (2016). [https://www.pubpub.org/pub/56e59d817b8ef338007f4cc4] version: 57a22cbc5a4037b8e01ad8c9
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oh! thx for this and all the subsequent references, I'm looking at them now... I'm interested to find the actual roots, but I'm always most interested in colloquial adoption, rather than historical precedent. I want to know when the idea of the user became, you know, a thing.
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Looking to cultural critic Raymond Williams, a rise in the use and purchase of goods (and therefore users) can also be traced within the etymology of the word consumer. By his account, expounded upon in Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society (1976), “In almost all its early English uses, consume had an unfavourable sense; it meant to destroy, to use up, to waste, to exhaust. It was from the middle 18th century that consumer began to emerge in a neutral sense in descriptions of bourgeois political economy.”